Spoon-billed Sandpiper

Calidris pygmeus

Order

CHARADRIIFORMES

Family

Sandpipers, Phalaropes (Scolopacidae)

Code 4

SBSA

Code 6

EURPYG

ITIS

ILLUSTRATION

ask community
Copyright © 2019 Mitch Waite Group

PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Critically Endangered

The Spoon-billed Sandpiper is a small wading bird found in northeastern Russia, and spends its winters in southeastern Asia. This species is characterized by a large, spatulate bill, which is swung from side to side in order to catch food. Breeding habitats consist of coastlines and adjacent land on the Chukchi Peninsula and the isthmus of the Kamchatka Peninsula. During winter months, this species migrates south to Japan, North Korea, South Korea and China. Its main wintering grounds are found in south and Southeast Asia. The conservation status of the Spoon-billed Sandpiper is Critically Endangered.

SUMMARY

Overview

Spoon-billed Sandpiper: Small sandpiper, scaled brown and black upperparts, red-brown wash on face, neck, spotted upper breast, white underparts. Most distinguishing characteristic is the extraordinarily flared tip on its black bill. Black legs, feet. Flight is swift and direct on rapid wing beats.


Range and Habitat

Spoon-billed Sandpiper: Breeds on the coast of far northeastern Siberia on the Chukchi Peninsula south to the Kamchatka Peninsula. Winters along the coasts of South and Southeast Asia, ranging from India east to the Philippines. Critically endangered. Very rarely seen in Alaska and British Columbia.

whatbird search for your browser

Spoon-billed Sandpiper SONGS AND CALLS

Similar Sounding


Voice Text

"wheet"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • The Spoonbill Sandpiper was first described by Linnaeus in his Systema Naturae in 1758 as Platalea pygmea. It was moved to its current genus by Sven Nilsson in 1821.
  • The main threats to its survival are habitat loss on its breeding grounds and loss of tidal flats through its migratory and wintering range.
  • This bird is endangered, with a current population of less than 2500 - probably less than 1000 - mature individuals.
  • A group of sandpipers has many collective nouns, including a "bind", "contradiction", "fling", "hill", and "time-step" of sandpipers.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP NORTH AMERICA

About this North America Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across North America.

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Artist

Yury Lisyak

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

.
UnderpartsX

Belly, undertail coverts, chest, flanks, and foreneck.

UpperpartsX
Back, rump, hindneck, wings, and crown.
BreastX
The upper front part of a bird.
FaceX
The front part of the head consisting of the bill, eyes, cheeks and chin.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X