Baird's Sandpiper

Calidris bairdii

Order

CHARADRIIFORMES

Family

Sandpipers, Phalaropes (Scolopacidae)

Code 4

BASA

Code 6

CALBAI

ITIS

ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The Baird's Sandpiper has a fairly large breeding range of 2,810,000 square kilometers. This includes dry tundra habitats in Alaska, eastern Siberia, and northern Canada. It winters in estuaries and dry grassy areas near ponds and other wetlands from Peru to southern Argentina. This species has also occurred as a vagrant to Europe. The population of this bird is thought to be around 300,000 individual birds. Currently, Baird's Sandpiper has a conservation rating of Least Concern.

SUMMARY

Overview

Baird's Sandpiper: This medium-sized bird has scaled gray-brown upperparts, white underparts and a dark-spotted gray-brown breast. The crown, face and neck are buff with fine brown streaks. It has a white rump with a dark central stripe and black legs and feet. Feeds on insects and spiders. Swift direct flight with rapid wing beats; long wings allow them to make long flights. Sexes are similar.


Range and Habitat

Baird's Sandpiper: Breeds in the Arctic from eastern Siberia and Alaska to northwestern Greenland. Spends winters in South America, migrating mostly through the interior of North America; uncommon on Atlantic and Pacific coasts. Preferred habitats include freshwater marshes, riverbanks, and lakesides; less frequent on coastal and brackish marshes and adjacent grasslands.

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Baird's Sandpiper SONGS AND CALLS

Baird's Sandpiper A1

Trilled "drrreee" calls given in flight and whistles upon landing.

Baird's Sandpiper A2

High-pitched calls from a large flock of feeding birds.

Similar Sounding


Voice Text

"Kreeep"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • Once the young develop their back feathers capable of shedding rain or snow, they no longer requiring brooding and the adults abandon them and begin their southbound migration. Without competition for food from the adults, the young probably mature more quickly, and a month later, begin their first migration.
  • Research shows that in the fall adults fly along a narrow route through the Great Plains of North America, while young birds migrate over a broad front, and sometimes appear on both Pacific and Atlantic coasts. It is suspected that they may cover up to 4,000 miles nonstop.
  • The Baird's Sandpiper was named in honor of Spencer Fullerton Baird (1823-1887), for many years Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution.
  • A group of sandpipers has many collective nouns, including a "bind", "contradiction", "fling", "hill", and "time-step" of sandpipers.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP NORTH AMERICA

About this North America Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across North America.

RANGE MAP HAWAII

About this Hawaii Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across the Hawaiian island.

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Artist

Chris Vest

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

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UnderpartsX

Belly, undertail coverts, chest, flanks, and foreneck.

UpperpartsX
Back, rump, hindneck, wings, and crown.
BreastX
The upper front part of a bird.
CrownX
The crown is the top part of the birds head.
FaceX
The front part of the head consisting of the bill, eyes, cheeks and chin.
RumpX
The area between the uppertail coverts and the back of the bird.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X