Egyptian Goose

Alopochen aegyptiaca

Order

ANSERIFORMES

Family

Ducks, Geese and Swans (Anatidae)

Code 4

EGGO

Code 6

ALOAEG

ITIS

ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The Egyptian Goose is native to sub-Saharan Africa and the Nile Valley but it is been introduced to several European countries and the United States, making its global range nearly 29,000,000 square kilometers. While there have not yet been formal population studies in North America, the worldwide population is estimated to be well over 500,000. Due to the spread of urbanization, managed agriculture, and artificial lakes created by dams, and despite local control efforts, the population is expanding and moving into new areas. For these reasons, the Egyptian Goose is rated as Least Concern.

SUMMARY

Overview

Egyptian Goose: Large goose with unmistakable plumage. Tan breast and belly with delicate gray vermiculations and brown breast spot; black primaries, rump, and tail, contrasting with white wing coverts and iridescent green secondaries. Brown mask with golden yellow eyes, and pink bill and legs. The origins of the North American population is uncertain but likely the result of captive escapees. Feeds on grass, seeds, leaves, aquatic plants, and food brought by humans. Direct flight with strong wingbeats.


Range and Habitat

Egyptian Goose: Native to sub-Saharan Africa and the Nile Valley. Popular as ornamental birds, escapees have been introduced across Europe and in North America. Florida, Texas, and southern California have established breeding populations. Found in other locations scattered across the southern United States. Texas populations undergo seasonal, short-distance migrations. In their native habitat, found in non-forested areas near water. Where it has been introduced occurs in parks, golf courses, and other bodies of water near developed areas.

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Egyptian Goose SONGS AND CALLS

Egyptian Goose_20190322_AS_XC104211_01.mp3

Egyptian Goose_20190322_AS_XC277060_02.mp3

Similar Sounding


Voice Text

Hisses, "hur, hur, hur"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • Despite the name, the Egyptian Goose is not actually a goose: It is a relative of the shelducks
  • Egyptian Geese are highly aggressive during the nesting season. A video released in 2016 captured one violently attacking a drone.
  • It is considered to be a pest in its native and adopted ranges. In Africa, it feeds heavily on grain crops; elsewhere its excessive droppings contaminate golf courses, resorts, and parks

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP NORTH AMERICA

About this North America Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across North America.

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Artist

Yury Lisyak

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

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BellyX
The ventral part of the bird, or the area between the flanks on each side and the crissum and breast. Flight muscles are located between the belly and the breast.
BreastX
The upper front part of a bird.
PrimariesX
The primaries are the flight feathers specialized for flight. They are attached to the "hand" equivalent part of the wing.
RumpX
The area between the uppertail coverts and the back of the bird.
SecondariesX
Flight feathers that are attached to the wing in the area similar to the human forearm and between the body and the primaries.
Wing covertsX
The feathers that cover and protect the flight feathers.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X