Rufous-tailed Bush-Hen

Amaurornis moluccana

Order

GRUIFORMES

Family

Rails, Gallinules and Coots (Rallidae)

Code 4

Non-AOU

Code 6

AMAMOL

ITIS

ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The Rufous-tailed Bush-Hen has a large breeding range of 1,270,000 square kilometers. This shy rail inhabits moist tropical forests in eastern and northern Australia, New Guinea, and the Solomon Islands, and has occurred as a vagrant to Palau. The global population of this species is estimated to be anywhere from 1,300 to 33,000 mature individuals. This species has been given a conservation rating of Least Concern on account of its large, stable population.

SUMMARY

Overview

Rufous-tailed Bush-Hen: Small to medium-sized, brown-gray rail with olive-brown back, wings, and tail, and a tan belly and vent. Rather short, yellow-green bill with yellow spot at the top base of the culmen. Short, broad wings. Very short tail. Fairly long green-yellow legs and feet. Sexes similar. Juvenile is paler with more white on throat.


Range and Habitat

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Rufous-tailed Bush-Hen SONGS AND CALLS

Rufous-tailed Bush-Hen H2

Piping calls and scratchy shrieks.

Rufous-tailed Bush-Hen P1

Most common call is series of wails and shrieks, usually given by a pair.

Similar Sounding


Voice Text

Shrieks, wails, and piping notes.

INTERESTING FACTS

  • Other common names for this species include Pale-vented Bush-hen, Rufous-tailed Waterhen, or Eastern Bush-hen.
  • The Rufous-tailed Bush-hen was described in 1865 by British naturalist A. R. Wallace.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP PALAU

About this Palau Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across the Palau islands.

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Artist

Chris Vest

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

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BellyX
The ventral part of the bird, or the area between the flanks on each side and the crissum and breast. Flight muscles are located between the belly and the breast.
CulmenX
The uppermost central ridge of the upper mandible.
VentX
Birds do not have two separate cavities for excrement and reproduction like humans do. In birds, there is one single entrance/exit that suits both functions called the vent, cloaca or anus.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X