Dollarbird

Eurystomus orientalis

Order

CORACIIFORMES

Family

Rollers (Coraciidae)

Code 4

Non-AOU

Code 6

EURORI

ITIS

ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The Dollarbird has a large range of nearly 14 million square kilometers. This species is found in a variety of forest habitats from southeastern Russia, Korea, and Japan south through eastern China to southeastern Asia. It is also found in New Guinea and northern and eastern Australia. Birds that breed in Australia, Russia, Korea, Japan, and China migrate to southern Asia and some Pacific islands during the winter months. Although the size of the population is unknown, and this species is declining in some areas, the population is believed to be stable and large enough to warrant a conservation rating of Least Concern.

SUMMARY

Overview

Dollarbird: Medium, blue-green roller with purple-blue throat, large, brown-olive head, and wide, orange-red bill. Long, pointed wings have purple-black flight feathers and white-blue patch on base of the primaries. Medium-length, purple-black, rectangular tail. Short orange-red legs and feet. Female and juvenile like male but duller.


Range and Habitat

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Dollarbird SONGS AND CALLS

Dollarbird I1

Call is a harsh "keck" or "kek-kek".

Dollarbird E1

Call is a repeated "keck".

Similar Sounding


Voice Text

"keck", "kek-kek"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • It is most commonly seen as a single bird, perched on a bare branch, high in a tree.
  • The Dollarbird, also called Oriental Dollarbird or Dollar Roller, was first described in 1766 in Java by Linnaeus.
  • This species takes its name from its distinctive coin-shaped markings on its wings.
  • A group of rollers is collectively known as a "flight", a "pair", a "swoop" and a "singular" of rollers.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP PALAU

About this Palau Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across the Palau islands.

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Artist

Chris Vest

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

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Flight feathersX
Located on the wing, and collectively called remiges (singular, remex). The long stiff feathers are subdivided into two major groups based on the location and are called primaries and secondaries.
PrimariesX
The primaries are the flight feathers specialized for flight. They are attached to the "hand" equivalent part of the wing.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X