Yellow-faced Grassquit

Tiaris olivaceus

Order

PASSERIFORMES

Family

Tanagers (Thraupidae)

Code 4

YFGR

Code 6

TIAOLI

ITIS

ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The Yellow-faced Grassquit has a fairly large range reaching up to generally 940,000 square kilometers. This bird can be found much of the Caribbean as well as parts of North, South and Central America including Bahama, Belize, Cayman Islands, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Puerto Rico, Turks and Caicos Islands, the United States and Venezuela. This species appears in tropical and subtropical shrublands and grasslands as well as pasturelands and deforested regions. The global population of this species has not been quantified, but it is referred to as “common” in portions of its range. Due to this, population trends for the Yellow-faced Grassquit have a present evaluation level of Least Concern.

SUMMARY

Overview

Yellow-faced Grassquit: This tiny finch has olive upperparts, pale olive underparts, black face, breast and upper belly, yellow eyebrow and throat patch, and a conical, sharply pointed bill. Forages on the ground for seeds; also feeds on berries, small fruits and insects. It has a weak fluttering flight, alternating rapid wing beats with wings pulled to the sides. Sexes are similar.


Range and Habitat

Yellow-faced Grassquit: This species is a resident breeder in the West Indies and Mexico from the Rio Grande Valley to the Yucatan Peninsula and south to northern Ecuador and Venezuela. It occurs as a rare vagrant to south Florida and southern Texas. Its preferred habitats include open grassy fields, brushy thickets, and shrubs.

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Yellow-faced Grassquit SONGS AND CALLS

Yellow-faced Grassquit H2

Song is a series of quick high-pitched trills.

Yellow-faced Grassquit H1

Calls and song.

Similar Sounding


Voice Text

"Siiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiir"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • The Yellow-faced Grassquit was first described in 1766 by Carolus Linnaeus, Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist.
  • During courtship, the male vibrates his wings as he sings a subdued song, sitting only 1-2 inches away so she can properly hear him.
  • It seems to benefit from deforestation, increasing in numbers and expanding its range.
  • A group of sparrows has many collective nouns, including a "crew", "flutter", "meinie", "quarrel", and "ubiquity" of sparrows.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP NORTH AMERICA

About this North America Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across North America.

RANGE MAP HAWAII

About this Hawaii Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across the Hawaiian island.

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Artist

Chris Vest

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

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UnderpartsX

Belly, undertail coverts, chest, flanks, and foreneck.

UpperpartsX
Back, rump, hindneck, wings, and crown.
BellyX
The ventral part of the bird, or the area between the flanks on each side and the crissum and breast. Flight muscles are located between the belly and the breast.
BreastX
The upper front part of a bird.
EyebrowX
Also called the supercilicum or superciliary it is the arch of feathers over each eye.
FaceX
The front part of the head consisting of the bill, eyes, cheeks and chin.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X