Black-faced Grassquit

Melanospiza bicolor

Order

PASSERIFORMES

Family

Tanagers (Thraupidae)

Code 4

BFGR

Code 6

MELBIC

ITIS

Egg Color:

White, marked at larger end with red brown



Number of Eggs:

2 - 3



Incubation Days:

12



Egg Incubator:

Female



Nest Location:

Low in bush or tree.



Nest Material:

Grass and twigs with lining of finer grass



Migration:

Nonmigratory



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General

Black-faced Grassquit: Small sparrow, very dark olive-gray with black head and breast. Female and juvenile are plain olive-gray above and gray below.

Range and Habitat

Black-faced Grassquit: This species is a native resident to the islands of the West Indies, with the exception of Cuba, and also on the northern coasts of Venezuela and Colombia. It is rarely seen in southern Florida, and those sightings are most likely of escaped caged birds. Their preferred habitats include open areas of grasses, scrub, and fields.

Breeding and Nesting

Black-faced Grassquit: Two to three white eggs with red brown markings are laid in a nest built by both sexes of grass and twigs lined with fine grass in low bushes or small trees less than 20 feet above the ground. Incubated by female for about 12 days.

Foraging and Feeding

Black-faced Grassquit: Eats mostly seeds and forages in grass and shrubbery. Will also eat berries, small fruit and, insects.

Vocalization

Black-faced Grassquit: Song is an insect like buzzing often repeated.

Similar Species

Black-faced Grassquit: Casual stray to Florida, similarly colored birds are larger.

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BreastX
The upper front part of a bird.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X