Black-faced Grassquit

Tiaris bicolor

Order

PASSERIFORMES

Family

Tanagers (Thraupidae)

Code 4

BFGR

Code 6

TIABIC

ITIS

ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The Black-faced Grassquit, the closest relative of the Darwin finches of the Galapagos Islands, has a range of 263,000 square kilometers. This includes pastures and grassy edge habitats in much of the Caribbean and parts of northern South America. It has also occurred as a vagrant to southern Florida. This species builds dome-shaped nests of grass which are placed low on banks, and feeds on seeds of grass plants. Due to maintained or increasing populations, the Black-faced Grassquit has a conservation status of Least Concern.

SUMMARY

Overview

Black-faced Grassquit: Small sparrow, very dark olive-gray with black head and breast. Black bill, legs and feet. Very common in the West Indies. Feeds mainly on seeds, especially of grasses and weeds. The flight is weak, bouncy and fluttering. Alternates rapid wing beats with pulling wings to body.


Range and Habitat

Black-faced Grassquit: This species is a native resident to the islands of the West Indies, with the exception of Cuba, and also on the northern coasts of Venezuela and Colombia. It is rarely seen in southern Florida, and those sightings are most likely of escaped caged birds. Their preferred habitats include open areas of grasses, scrub, and fields.

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Black-faced Grassquit SONGS AND CALLS

Black-faced Grassquit O1

Song is a "dzeet-zeezeeree".

Black-faced Grassquit NN1

Buzzy song, "tsee-eee-reeee".

Similar Sounding


Voice Text

"zeezeezee"; "tik-tink-tink-tzeeeeeeeee"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • Males on the South American mainland have more extensively black underparts, shading to a grey belly.
  • The male Black-faced Grassquit has a display flight in which he flies for short distances, vibrating his wings and giving a buzzing dik-zeezeezee call.
  • They are often found in small groups, but are solitary at evening roosts.
  • A group of sparrows has many collective nouns, including a "crew", "flutter", "meinie", "quarrel", and "ubiquity" of sparrows.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP NORTH AMERICA

About this North America Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across North America.

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Artist

Yury Lisyak

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