Green Sandpiper

Tringa ochropus

Order

CHARADRIIFORMES

Family

Sandpipers, Phalaropes (Scolopacidae)

Code 4

GRSA

Code 6

TRIOCH

ITIS

ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The Green Sandpiper has a large range, estimated at 10,000,000 square kilometers globally. It is native to Europe, Asia, and Africa, and has been spotted in the United States and Australia as well. This bird prefers freshwater ecosystems such as forests, grasslands, and inland wetlands, though it has been known to reside in pasture land, rural gardens, and even wastewater treatment areas or canals. The estimated global population of the bird is between 1,200,000 and 4,000,000 individuals and does not show signs of decline that would necessitate inclusion on the IUCN Red List. Because of this, the current evaluation status of the Green Sandpiper is Least Concern.

IBIRD EXPLORER GENERAL

PHOTO SHARING AND DISCUSSION

BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

SUMMARY

Overview

Green Sandpiper: Medium sandpiper with pale-spotted, dark gray-brown back and rump, white underparts with dark streaks on neck, upper breast, sides. Head is dark and eye-ring is white. Tail is white with fine dark spotting at tip. Bill, legs, feet are olive-green. Swift flight with rapid wing beats.

 

Range and Habitat

Green Sandpiper: This species breeds in the northern forest habitats across Europe and Asia, wintering around small bodies of water across a broad geographic area from Africa to Southeast Asia. On very rare occasions, this sandpiper shows up on the Aleutian Islands of Alaska during its spring migration.

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Green Sandpiper SONGS AND CALLS

Green Sandpiper L1

Rapid alarm calls given by a juvenile.

Green Sandpiper L2

High-pitched "peep-peep" calls from a juvenile.

Similar Sounding


Voice Text

"weet weet wit wit"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • The Green Sandpiper was first described by Linnaeus in 1758.
  • Unlike most other birds in its family, it will nest in trees.
  • It is also known to adopt old nests from other species, such as the Fieldfare.
  • A group of sandpipers has many collective nouns, including a "bind", "contradiction", "fling", "hill", and "time-step" of sandpipers.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP NORTH AMERICA

About this North America Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across North America.

RANGE MAP PALAU

About this Palau Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across the Palau islands.

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Gary Owen Dick

Artist

Michael Oberhofer

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

BACKYARD BIRDING

BIRDS AND BIRDING

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UnderpartsX

Belly, undertail coverts, chest, flanks, and foreneck.

BreastX
The upper front part of a bird.
RumpX
The area between the uppertail coverts and the back of the bird.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X