Common Sandpiper

Actitis hypoleucos

Order

CHARADRIIFORMES

Family

Sandpipers, Phalaropes (Scolopacidae)

Code 4

COSA

Code 6

ACTHYP

ITIS

Egg Color:

Pink gray with brown red speckles



Number of Eggs:

4



Incubation Days:

21 - 22



Egg Incubator:

Both sexes



Nest Location:

In streamside vegetation and rocks.



Nest Material:

Bits of vegetation and debris.



Migration:

Migratory



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General

Common Sandpiper: Eurasian counterpart to the Spotted Sandpiper; has dusky gray upperparts, heavily streaked breast, and sparkling white underparts. Best distinguished by its habit of standing in a semi-crouch and bobbing back and forth. Sexes are similar. Juvenile has tiny white speckles on upperparts and less streaking on breast.

Range and Habitat

Common Sandpiper: Breeds across much of Europe and Asia in temperate and subtropical regions. In nonbreeding season, wanders widely along fresh and salt water edges throughout Europe, Africa, Middle East, South Asia, and Australia. Very rarely found near the Aleutian Islands in Alaska. Found along the water's edge and grasslands.

Breeding and Nesting

Common Sandpiper: Nests along a wide variety of freshwater lakes and rivers across Europe and Asia. Lays four pink gray eggs with fine brown red speckles. Both parents incubate 21 to 22 days, and both parents look over young as they feed themselves.

Foraging and Feeding

Common Sandpiper: Frequents rocky shorelines, bobbing as it walks along the water edge picking small invertebrates from the surface of rocks and mud.

Vocalization

Common Sandpiper: Call is a shrill, piping "swee wee wee."

Similar Species

Wood Sandpiper has mottled upperparts and fine streaking on the head, neck and breast.

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UnderpartsX

Belly, undertail coverts, chest, flanks, and foreneck.

UpperpartsX
Back, rump, hindneck, wings, and crown.
BreastX
The upper front part of a bird.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X