Broad-billed Sandpiper

Calidris falcinellus

Order

CHARADRIIFORMES

Family

Sandpipers, Phalaropes (Scolopacidae)

Code 4

BBIS

Code 6

LIMFAL

ITIS

ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The Broad-billed Sandpiper has a large breeding range of around one million square kilometers. It breeds in wet bogs and tundra in Scandinavia and northern Russia, and winters in mud flats, and other brackish habitats in parts of the Middle East, southern Asia, and Australasia. This species has an estimated population of 71,000-160,000 individuals and has also occurred as a vagrant to the United States. Although it is threatened by habitat destruction on its migration route, and appears to be declining, the population is still believed to be large and stable enough to warrant a conservation rating of Least Concern.

SUMMARY

Overview

Broad-billed Sandpiper: Small sandpiper with a long bill that curves down at the tip. Pale-edged dark brown feathers on upperparts give a scaled appearance; back shows two pale streaks in flight; underparts are white with dark spots on breast and neck. Head has dark cap and forked white eyebrows.

 

Range and Habitat

Broad-billed Sandpiper: Breeds in northern Europe and Asia and winters coastlines of South Asia. Juveniles very rarely show up in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska, usually during its fall migration. Habitats used during nonbreeding season range from muddy pond margins and wet meadows to rocky beaches and tidal mudflats.

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Broad-billed Sandpiper SONGS AND CALLS

Broad-billed Sandpiper S1

Alarm calls made when flushed.

Broad-billed Sandpiper P1

High-pitched calls from a migrating flock.

Similar Sounding


Voice Text

"bree, bree, bree"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • The Broad-billed Sandpiper is the only member of the genus Limicola; some have proposed that it should be placed in the genus Erolia with the "stint" sandpipers but recent research suggests that it is should go into the genus Philomachus with the ruff and possibly the Sharp-tailed Sandpiper.
  • They often feed while wading, in water so deep that they have to submerge their heads and necks in order to probe the underlying mud.
  • Unlike most other small wader species, which often occur in flocks of hundreds of individuals, they are almost exclusively found in groups of less than 10. Only in Hungary are they recorded regularly in moderate numbers.
  • A group of sandpipers has many collective nouns, including a "bind", "contradiction", "fling", "hill", and "time-step" of sandpipers.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP NORTH AMERICA

About this North America Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across North America.

RANGE MAP PALAU

About this Palau Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across the Palau islands.

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Artist

Yury Lisyak

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

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UnderpartsX

Belly, undertail coverts, chest, flanks, and foreneck.

UpperpartsX
Back, rump, hindneck, wings, and crown.
BreastX
The upper front part of a bird.
CapX
The area on top of the head of the bird.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X