Northern Shoveler

Anas clypeata

Order

ANSERIFORMES

Family

Ducks, Geese and Swans (Anatidae)

Code 4

NSHO

Code 6

ANACLY

ITIS

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ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The Northern Shoveler has a large range, estimated globally at 10,000,000 square kilometers. Native to the Americas, Europe, Asia, and Africa and introduced to Australia, this bird prefers grassland, wetland, and marine ecosystems. The global population of this bird is estimated at 5,000,000 to 6,400,000 individuals and does not show signs of decline that would necessitate inclusion on the IUCN Red List. For this reason, the current evaluation status of the Northern Shoveler is Least Concern.

IBIRD EXPLORER GENERAL

PHOTO SHARING AND DISCUSSION

BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

SUMMARY

Overview

Northern Shoveler: This is a medium-sized dabbling duck with a large spoon-shaped bill. Males have a dark green head, dark bill, orange legs, yellow eyes, white breast and chestnut patch on the flanks; females are mottled light brown with orange-brown bill and legs and dark eyes. They feed mostly on aquatic plants and seeds. They have a strong direct flight with powerful rapid wing beats.


Range and Habitat

Northern Shoveler: Breeds from Alaska and northern Manitoba south to California, Nebraska, and Wisconsin; local and uncommon in the Great Lakes area and the northeast. Winters from Oregon across the southern half of the U.S. to the Gulf Coast, north to New Jersey, and south to Central America. Prefers marshes and prairie potholes; sometimes found on salt or brackish marshes.

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SONGS AND CALLS

Voice Text

"who, who, who", "took, took, took"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • The Northern Shoveler was first described in 1758 by Carolus Linnaeus, Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist.
  • Socially, they occasionally work together in groups while feeding, rotating like a pin-wheel, stirring up the surface water and skimming it for food particles.
  • They are often referred to as the "Spoonbill" or "Spoony" because of their unique spatulate shaped bill, which has about 110 fine projections (called lamellae) along the edges, for straining food from water.
  • A group of ducks has many collective nouns, including a "brace", "flush", "paddling", "raft", and "team" of ducks.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP

CERange Map for Northern Shoveler

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Gary Owen Dick

Artist

Yury Lisyak

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

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BIRDS AND BIRDING

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BreastX
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