Orange Bishop

Euplectes franciscanus

Order

PASSERIFORMES

Family

Weavers (Ploceidae)

Code 4

ORBI

Code 6

EUPFRA

ITIS

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ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Unknown

The Orange Bishop has a tremendous range extending up to 3,400,000 square kilometers. This bird can be found in many areas of Africa, including Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Togo and Uganda. It inhabits savanna and grassland as well as arable regions also. The global population of this bird is not quantified, but it is referred to as “common” in its range. Currently, it is not believed that the population trends for this species will soon approach the minimum levels that could suggest a potential decline in population. Due to this, population trends for the Orange Bishop have a present evaluation level of Least Concern.

IBIRD EXPLORER GENERAL

PHOTO SHARING AND DISCUSSION

BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

SUMMARY

Overview

Orange Bishop: Small weaver finch with bright orange-red body and black belly. The head has a black crown, face, and bill and the wings are brown. Orange-red uppertail coverts are very long and extend over the short, brown tail. Native to sub-Saharan Africa. AKA Orange Weaver Finch.


Range and Habitat

Orange Bishop: Native to northwest and eastern Africa; introduced to and established in Puerto Rico, Bermuda, and across the United States. Currently found in California, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Wisconsin, and in the Mid-Atlantic States. Inhabits open savanna habitats with tall shrubs and trees.

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SONGS AND CALLS

Voice Text

No data available.

INTERESTING FACTS

  • It is also known as the Red Bishop, Grenadier Weaver, Orange Bishop Weaver, and Orange Weaver.
  • It was formerly regarded as a subspecies of the Southern Red Bishop of the southern half of Africa. The two are now usually classified as separate species.
  • The Orange Bishop was first described in 1789 by Paul Erdmann Isert, a German botanist.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP

CENo Range Map Available

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Gary Owen Dick

Artist

Irina Rud-Volga

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

BACKYARD BIRDING

BIRDS AND BIRDING

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BellyX
The ventral part of the bird, or the area between the flanks on each side and the crissum and breast. Flight muscles are located between the belly and the breast.
CrownX
The crown is the top part of the birds head.
FaceX
The front part of the head consisting of the bill, eyes, cheeks and chin.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X