Fieldfare

Turdus pilaris

Order

PASSERIFORMES

Family

Thrushes (Turdidae)

Code 4

FIEL

Code 6

TURPIL

ITIS

ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The Fieldfare is known to be native to many portions of the Middle East as well as parts of Europe. The range of this bird species is about 10 million square kilometers. The Fieldfare has an estimated population of possibly 48 million individual birds. At this time the Fieldfare is evaluated as Least Concern. The previous rating for this bird species was Lower Risk. The current rating of Least Concern reflects the size of both this bird's population as well as its native range. At this time there are not believed to be any immediate threats to the Fieldfare.

IBIRD EXPLORER GENERAL

PHOTO SHARING AND DISCUSSION

BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

SUMMARY

Overview

Fieldfare: Large, robin-like thrush with rufous back with gray head and rump. Underparts are brown-barred white on breast and sides, and white on belly. Wings are rufous. Tail is dark gray to black. The bill is yellow with a dark tip. Strong and fast flight on rapidly beating wings.

 

Range and Habitat

Fieldfare: Occurs widely, often in large numbers, in most of central and southern Europe in winter; also common in Siberia and Greenland. Casual in Alaska and accidental elsewhere in North America; preferred habitats include woods and woodland edges in summer and open country, fields, and agricultural areas in winter.

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Fieldfare SONGS AND CALLS

Fieldfare G1

Call is a harsh "shak-shak-shak".

Fieldfare G2

Alarm calls.

Similar Sounding


Voice Text

"shak-shak-shak"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • The Fieldfare was first described by Linnaeus in his Systema naturae in 1758 under its current scientific name.
  • The English name, dating back to at least the twelfth century, derives from the Anglo-Saxon feld-fere meaning "traveller through the fields", probably from their constantly moving, foraging habits.
  • Unusual for a thrush, they often nest in small colonies, possibly for protection from large crows.
  • A group of fieldfares are collectively known as a "flock" of fieldfares.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP NORTH AMERICA

About this North America Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across North America.

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Gary Owen Dick

Artist

Michael Oberhofer

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

BACKYARD BIRDING

BIRDS AND BIRDING

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UnderpartsX

Belly, undertail coverts, chest, flanks, and foreneck.

BellyX
The ventral part of the bird, or the area between the flanks on each side and the crissum and breast. Flight muscles are located between the belly and the breast.
BreastX
The upper front part of a bird.
RumpX
The area between the uppertail coverts and the back of the bird.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X