Bendire's Thrasher

Toxostoma bendirei

Order

PASSERIFORMES

Family

Mockingbirds and Thrashers (Mimidae)

Code 4

BETH

Code 6

TOXBEN

ITIS

ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Vulnerable

The Bendire's Thrasher has a fairly large breeding range of 823,000 square kilometers. This includes desert habitats with tall vegetation and juniper woodlands in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Northern populations winter in southern Arizona and New Mexico, and northwestern Mexico. This species has an estimated global breeding population of 70,000. The Bendire's Thrasher has a conservation rating of Vulnerable because the species has shown a large decline over several decades. It may be threatened by conversion of its habitat to urban areas and agriculture, as well as competition with the Curve-billed Thrasher.

IBIRD EXPLORER GENERAL

PHOTO SHARING AND DISCUSSION

BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

SUMMARY

Overview

Bendire's Thrasher: Medium thrasher with olive-brown upperparts, spotted buff underparts. Bill is short, gray and slightly decurved with pale pink lower mandible base. Eyes are yellow-orange. Tail is long, olive-brown above, black with white tips below, and has brown undertail coverts.

 

Range and Habitat

Bendire's Thrasher: Breeds in southeastern California, southern Nevada, southern Utah, and western and central New Mexico south to central Sonora. Spends winters in northwestern Mexico. Preferred habitats include semi-desert and desert areas, with large shrubs or cacti and open ground, and open woodlands with scattered shrubs and trees.

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Bendire's Thrasher SONGS AND CALLS

Bendire's Thrasher B1

Call is a low "chup", may be trilled.

Bendire's Thrasher B2

Trilled calls.

Similar Sounding


Voice Text

"chek" ,"chek-chek"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • Prefers deserts less than 1800m in elevation, and can inhabit areas around human habitation and agriculture if Curve-billed Thrashers are absent.
  • The Bendire's Thrasher was first identified in 1872 by U.S. Army Lieutenant Charles Bendire. It was the last of the thrashers to be described in North America because it is so similar to other thrashers in its range.
  • They fly from bush to bush, whereas other desert thrashers almost never fly.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP NORTH AMERICA

About this North America Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across North America.

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Gary Owen Dick

Artist

Samira Belous

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

BACKYARD BIRDING

BIRDS AND BIRDING

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UnderpartsX

Belly, undertail coverts, chest, flanks, and foreneck.

Undertail covertsX
Small feathers that cover the areas where the retrices (tail feathers) attach to the rump.
UpperpartsX
Back, rump, hindneck, wings, and crown.
Lower mandibleX
The lower part of the bill.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X