Brambling

Fringilla montifringilla

Order

PASSERIFORMES

Family

Fringilline & Cardueline Finches (Fringillidae)

Code 4

BRAM

Code 6

FRIMON

ITIS

ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The Brambling has a large breeding range, estimated globally at 11,400,000 square kilometers. The bird species breeds in coniferous and birch woodlands in much of Scandinavia, a large part of Russia, and northern Kazakhstan and Mongolia, and winters in a variety of habitats in Europe, northwestern Africa, and central and eastern Asia. It has also occurred as a vagrant in Canada and the United States. The global population of the Brambling is estimated to range between 79 and 246 million individuals. The population is not estimated to meet decline trends that would necessitate inclusion on the IUCN Red List. Because of this, the conservation rating of the Brambling is Least Concern.

IBIRD EXPLORER GENERAL

PHOTO SHARING AND DISCUSSION

BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

SUMMARY

Overview

Brambling: Medium-sized finch with jet-black hood, brown-black back and orange shoulder patches, throat, and breast. Fall plumage has buff-edged upperparts. Underparts are buff with black-spotted flanks. Wings are black with white and orange bars. Bounding flight, rapid wing beats alternating with wings at sides.

 

Range and Habitat

Brambling: A Eurasian species, common but irregular as a migrant in the Bering Sea region, including the Aleutians; casual in fall and winter in southern Alaska; accidental south to Canada and northwestern U.S. states. Prefers northern forests with birch trees during breeding season; agricultural fields, woodlands (especially beech), parks, and gardens during winter.

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Brambling SONGS AND CALLS

Brambling G1

Call is a harsh "dzhweeee".

Similar Sounding


Voice Text

"dzhweeeee", "check-check-check", "tweerk"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • Bramblings are well-known for the unpredictability of their migrations; birds wintering in Great Britain have been recovered in Italy the next.
  • This irregularity may be associated with the dependence of brambling flocks on the seeds of a few trees, especially beech, that tend to be produced plentifully in alternate years in different localities.
  • Unlike most finches, their young are fed extensively on insects.
  • A group of finches has many collective nouns, including a "charm", "company", and "trembling" of finches.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP NORTH AMERICA

About this North America Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across North America.

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Gary Owen Dick

Artist

Michael Oberhofer

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

BACKYARD BIRDING

BIRDS AND BIRDING

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UnderpartsX

Belly, undertail coverts, chest, flanks, and foreneck.

UpperpartsX
Back, rump, hindneck, wings, and crown.
BreastX
The upper front part of a bird.
ShoulderX
The short feathers overlying the median secondary coverts on the top of the wing. They are located near the back and can be seen as the “first row” of feathers on the birds wing. They are also called marginal coverts and lesser secondary coverts.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X