Wood Thrush

Hylocichla mustelina

Order

PASSERIFORMES

Family

Thrushes (Turdidae)

Code 4

WOTH

Code 6

HYLMUS

ITIS

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ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Near Threatened

The Wood Thrush has a large breeding range of around 3.5 million square kilometers. This includes deciduous forests in southeastern Canada, and much of the eastern United States. It winters in tropical forests in eastern Mexico south to Panama. The global population of this bird is estimated to be around 11 million breeding individual birds. It is threatened by habitat loss and fragmentation on its breeding and wintering grounds. Although the Wood Thrush has a large population, it has been undergoing a long-term decline for several years, and has a conservation rating of Near Threatened.

IBIRD EXPLORER GENERAL

PHOTO SHARING AND DISCUSSION

BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

SUMMARY

Overview

Wood Thrush: Medium thrush, rust-brown upperparts, white underparts with heavy dark brown spots. Eye-rings are white. Black bill has creamy pink base on lower mandible. In the early 1900s, its range began to expand north, forcing the Veery and Hermit thrushes to find another habitat.

 

Range and Habitat

Wood Thrush: Breeds across central and eastern North America from southern Manitoba, Ontario, and Nova Scotia south to Florida and Gulf of Mexico. Spends winters in tropics from the Yucatan Peninsula south. Found in moist, deciduous woodlands with a thick understory; also well-planted parks and gardens.

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SONGS AND CALLS

Voice Text

"ee-o-lee", "ee-o-lay", "qurirt", "pit-pit-pit"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • The Wood Thrush was first described by German naturalist Johann Friedrich Gmelin in 1789. It is best known for its hauntingly beautiful song.
  • It is the official bird of the District of Columbia.
  • The genus name is a direct translation of its common name, derived from the Greek words for woodland and thrush or fieldfare. The species name comes from the Latin mustela, or weasel.
  • A group of thrushes are collectively known as a "hermitage" and a "mutation" of thrushes.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP NORTH AMERICA

About this North America Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across North America.

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Gary Owen Dick

Artist

Irina Rud-Volga

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

BACKYARD BIRDING

BIRDS AND BIRDING

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UnderpartsX

Belly, undertail coverts, chest, flanks, and foreneck.

UpperpartsX
Back, rump, hindneck, wings, and crown.
Lower mandibleX
The lower part of the bill.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X