Rufous-winged Sparrow

Peucaea carpalis

Order

PASSERIFORMES

Family

New World Sparrows and Towhees (Passerellida)

Code 4

RWSP

Code 6

PEUCAR

ITIS

ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The Rufous-winged Sparrow has a modest range, residing mainly in the span between southern Arizona in the United States and Sinaloa, Mexico. Native to the United States and Mexico, this bird prefers subtropical or tropical shrubland or grassland ecosystems. The global population of this bird is estimated at 74,000 individuals and does not show signs of decline that would necessitate inclusion on the IUCN Red List. For this reason, the current evaluation status of the Rufous-winged Sparrow is Least Concern.

IBIRD EXPLORER GENERAL

PHOTO SHARING AND DISCUSSION

BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

SUMMARY

Overview

Rufous-winged Sparrow: Medium sparrow, gray-brown upperparts finely streaked with black; underparts are white. Pale gray head has rufous crown divided by gray median stripe, red-brown eye-line, and black moustache stripe. Wings are brown with rufous shoulder patches and two white bars.

 

Range and Habitat

Rufous-winged Sparrow: Year-round resident from south-central Arizona and Guadalupe Canyon, New Mexico, south to northern Sinaloa, Mexico. Inhabits desert grasslands with scattered mesquite or cholla. Also occurs in washes with sandy bottoms and vegetated slopes, brushy irrigation ditches, and creeks bordered by broad-leaved trees, mesquite, grasses and forbs.

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Rufous-winged Sparrow SONGS AND CALLS

Rufous-winged Sparrow A1

Repeated "pip" calls.

Rufous-winged SparrowA2

Short song phrases.

Similar Sounding


Voice Text

"chip-chip-chip", "sweet-sweet-sweet", "seep", "tsit"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • The Rufous-winged Sparrow is shy, elusive, and difficult to see except when the male is singing from exposed perches.
  • This species is considered at-risk due to its limited geographic range. Within this range its grassland and shrubland habitat has been rapidly lost to development and agriculture.
  • This species was first discovered in 1872, near old Fort Lowell, Tucson, where it was described as "very common". After 1886, verified records were exceedingly rare. It was considered extinct in Arizona due to overgrazing. It was rediscovered in 1936, the first record in over fifty years.
  • A group of sparrows has many collective nouns, including a "crew", "flutter", "meinie", "quarrel", and "ubiquity" of sparrows.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP NORTH AMERICA

About this North America Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across North America.

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Gary Owen Dick

Artist

Irina Rud-Volga

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

BACKYARD BIRDING

BIRDS AND BIRDING

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UnderpartsX

Belly, undertail coverts, chest, flanks, and foreneck.

UpperpartsX
Back, rump, hindneck, wings, and crown.
CrownX
The crown is the top part of the birds head.
ShoulderX
The short feathers overlying the median secondary coverts on the top of the wing. They are located near the back and can be seen as the “first row” of feathers on the birds wing. They are also called marginal coverts and lesser secondary coverts.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X