Ashy Storm-Petrel

Oceanodroma homochroa

Order

PROCELLARIIFORMES

Family

Storm-Petrels (Hydrobatidae)

Code 4

ASSP

Code 6

OCEHOM

ITIS

ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Endangered

The Ashy Storm-Petrel breeds on a small number of islands off the coasts of California and Baja California and occurs in waters near those islands. It is threatened by introduced predators, human disturbance at nesting sites, pollution, and climate change affecting food sources. This species has an estimated population of 5,200-10,000 individuals, and because of this small and declining population, and the threats listed above, also has a conservation rating of Endangered.

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BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

SUMMARY

Overview

Ashy Storm-Petrel: Small seabird, gray-black overall, dark bill, forked tail. Gray wash on underwing coverts are visible at close range. Legs and feet are dark gray. Unlike most storm-petrels, it doesn't travel far from colonies after breeding. Flight is fluttering and direct on shallow wing beats.

 

Range and Habitat

Ashy Storm-Petrel: Found on the islands off California and in the adjacent waters. This species' limited year-round range extends from Cape Mendocino, California, to northern Baja, just south of the United States and Mexico border. Pelagic, comes ashore only to breed on rocky islands among talus slopes, from just above sea level to the highest, interior portions of nesting islands.

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Ashy Storm-Petrel SONGS AND CALLS

Ashy Storm-Petrel

Raspy and "churrr" calls given from a burrow.

Similar Sounding


Voice Text

Generally silent.

INTERESTING FACTS

  • The Ashy Storm-petrel is a long-lived bird, a banded individual has been recorded living at least 31 years.
  • Both its common and scientific name come from its coloration, one authority has suggested naming it Coues's Storm Petrel after the man that described the species, Elliott Coues.
  • The nocturnal nature of this species and its hidden nests make it difficult to assess population trends. Long-term records for the Farallon Islands do not seem to show significant changes from the 1880's to 1970.
  • Unlike most other species of storm-petrel, they do not travel far from their colonies after breeding, and the breeding season is spread out over most of the year.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP NORTH AMERICA

About this North America Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across North America.

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Gary Owen Dick

Artist

Yury Lisyak

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BIRDS AND BIRDING

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PelagicX
The pelagic is a type of bird whose habitat is on the open ocean rather than in a coastal region or on inland bodies of water (lakes, rivers). An example of a pelagic bird is the blacklegged kittiwake.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X