Wilson's Storm-Petrel

Oceanites oceanicus

Order

PROCELLARIIFORMES

Family

Storm-Petrels (Hydrobatidae)

Code 4

WISP

Code 6

OCEOCE

ITIS

ILLUSTRATION

ask community
Copyright © 2004 - 2017 Mitch Waite Group

PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The Wilson's Storm-Petrel has a very large range reaching up to generally between 50,000 to 100,000 square kilometers. This bird can be found throughout an enormous area including all of North America - meaning Canada, the United States and Mexico, a majority of South and Central America and the Caribbean and areas of Europe, the Middle East and Africa as well. This is a marine bird found primarily in rocky and shoreline areas containing sea cliffs and peaks. The global population of this bird is estimated to be around 6 million individual birds. It is not believed that the population trends for this species will soon approach the minimum levels that could suggest a potential decline in population. Due to this, population trends for the Wilson's Storm-Petrel have a present evaluation level of Least Concern.

IBIRD EXPLORER GENERAL

PHOTO SHARING AND DISCUSSION

BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

SUMMARY

Overview

Wilson's Storm Petrel: This small storm-petrel has a brown-black body, pale brown wing bands and a large, white rump. It has a fine black bill with very pronounced tubes. It feeds mainly on pelagic crustaceans and fish. The wings are short and rounded. The feet extend past the tail in flight. It has a direct flight with steady, shallow wing beats. The sexes are similar in size and coloration.

 

Range and Habitat

Wilson's Storm-Petrel: Breeds on rocky islands in the Antarctic and sub-Antarctic seas; in non-breeding season, this species ranges northward over the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian oceans; in the eastern Pacific it is very rarely found north to Monterey Bay. Highly pelagic, it comes ashore only to breed.

whatbird search for your browser

Wilson's Storm-Petrel SONGS AND CALLS

Wilson's Storm-Petrel Silent

Generally silent except on breeding grounds.

Similar Sounding


Voice Text

"Peep-peep-peep-peep"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • They are difficult birds for most people to see because they spend all their lives at sea when not breeding, and even during the breeding season they only come to land after dark and leave again before dawn.
  • They have yellow webbing between their toes. Modern field guides do not usually show this characteristic as it is not really a field mark being so rarely observed.
  • Wilson's Storm-petrels have one of the longest migrations known, and travel in a figure eight each year from breeding grounds in the Antarctic to the subarctic feeding grounds and back again.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP NORTH AMERICA

About this North America Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across North America.

RANGE MAP HAWAII

About this Hawaii Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across the Hawaiian island.

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Gary Owen Dick

Artist

Irina Rud-Volga

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

BACKYARD BIRDING

BIRDS AND BIRDING

.
PelagicX
The pelagic is a type of bird whose habitat is on the open ocean rather than in a coastal region or on inland bodies of water (lakes, rivers). An example of a pelagic bird is the blacklegged kittiwake.
RumpX
The area between the uppertail coverts and the back of the bird.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X