Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel

Oceanodroma furcata

Order

PROCELLARIIFORMES

Family

Storm-Petrels (Hydrobatidae)

Code 4

FTSP

Code 6

OCEFUR

ITIS

ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel is ranked at this time as Least Concern due to its range and population. This bird is primarily known to breed on the Aleutian Islands off the Alaskan coast and sometimes on the coasts of British Columbia. This bird spends most of its time at sea and prefers cooler waters. At this time there are not believed to be any immediate dangers facing the Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel which would indicate the need for concern regarding the immediate future of this bird's population, thus the Least Concern evaluation.

SUMMARY

Overview

Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel: Medium storm-petrel, blue-gray upperparts, pale gray underparts. Forehead is dark gray, eye patch is gray. Primaries are darker gray than other flight feathers. Forked tail, feathers are narrowly white-tipped. Alternates rapid, shallow wing beats and stiff-winged glides.

 

Range and Habitat

Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel: Breeds on islands from southern Alaska and the Aleutian archipelago south to northern California. Occurs throughout the northern Pacific Ocean; rare along the California coast, more common off British Columbia and Alaska. This species is pelagic, only coming ashore during breeding season.

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Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel SONGS AND CALLS

Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel LLL1

Raspy "krieh" calls from birds returning to their nesting burrows.

Similar Sounding


Voice Text

Generally silent

INTERESTING FACTS

  • The Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel stores oil in its stomach. They regurgitate the oil onto predators, and sometimes onto each other during squabbles over nest sites. It is also used to feed chicks.
  • The single egg laid is approximately 20 percent of the female's body weight, one of the largest eggs relative to body size of all birds.
  • Adults don't feed the chick in bad weather. After several days without food, the chick reduces its body temperature and goes into a state of torpor in which growth nearly ceases.
  • They use their sense of smell to find food at sea and are often the first birds to arrive at an odor source.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP NORTH AMERICA

About this North America Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across North America.

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Artist

Irina Rud-Volga

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

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UnderpartsX

Belly, undertail coverts, chest, flanks, and foreneck.

UpperpartsX
Back, rump, hindneck, wings, and crown.
Flight feathersX
Located on the wing, and collectively called remiges (singular, remex). The long stiff feathers are subdivided into two major groups based on the location and are called primaries and secondaries.
PrimariesX
The primaries are the flight feathers specialized for flight. They are attached to the "hand" equivalent part of the wing.
PelagicX
The pelagic is a type of bird whose habitat is on the open ocean rather than in a coastal region or on inland bodies of water (lakes, rivers). An example of a pelagic bird is the blacklegged kittiwake.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X