Pink-footed Shearwater

Ardenna creatopus

Order

PROCELLARIIFORMES

Family

Petrels and Shearwaters (Procellariidae)

Code 4

PFSH

Code 6

PUFCRE

ITIS

ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Vulnerable

The Pink-footed Shearwater is a native of Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru and the United States with occurrences in Argentina, Australia, New Zealand and Ecuador as well. Its preferred habitat for the breeding season varies according to its location, and includes forests and shrublands, and its feeding grounds tend to be marine environments in offshore locations. The global population of this bird is estimated to be around 20,000 breeding pairs or a possible 100,000 individual birds. Currently, the population trends for this species indicate incredible challenges presented by limited breeding grounds and the effects of humans and predators. Due to this, population trends for the Pink-footed Shearwater have a present evaluation level of Vulnerable.

IBIRD EXPLORER GENERAL

PHOTO SHARING AND DISCUSSION

BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

SUMMARY

Overview

Pink-footed Shearwater: Large shearwater, gray-brown upperparts, white underparts, mottled brown flanks and undertail coverts. Head is gray-brown and pink bill is tipped with black. Flight feathers are dark-bordered and underwing coverts are mottled gray. Alternates slow wing beats with low glides.

 

Range and Habitat

Pink-footed Shearwater: Breeds on islands off coast of Chile; migratory, and a regular summer visitor off the Pacific Coast of North America from central Mexico to southern Alaska. Winters in the subarctic waters of the Pacific Ocean. Pelagic, preferring open ocean, well offshore over the continental shelf coming ashore only for breeding.

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Pink-footed Shearwater SONGS AND CALLS

Pink-footed Shearwater A1

Harsh calls.

Similar Sounding


Voice Text

Generally silent

INTERESTING FACTS

  • The Pink-footed Shearwater was first mentioned in the diaries and ship logs of sailing vessels that visited the Juan Fernández Islands in the late 1600s and early 1700s.
  • Although the practice of harvesting chicks for food is illegal on Isla Mocha, they are considered a local delicacy and 20 percent of the annual chick production (3,000–5,000) is harvested each year, from March to May, by the island’s residents.
  • They appear similar to immature gulls but can be separated at great distances by their different flight styles. Shearwaters fly closer to the surface of the water, often disappearing behind swells.
  • A group of shearwaters are collectively known as an "improbability" of shearwaters.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP NORTH AMERICA

About this North America Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across North America.

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Gary Owen Dick

Artist

Irina Rud-Volga

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

BACKYARD BIRDING

BIRDS AND BIRDING

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UnderpartsX

Belly, undertail coverts, chest, flanks, and foreneck.

Undertail covertsX
Small feathers that cover the areas where the retrices (tail feathers) attach to the rump.
UpperpartsX
Back, rump, hindneck, wings, and crown.
Flight feathersX
Located on the wing, and collectively called remiges (singular, remex). The long stiff feathers are subdivided into two major groups based on the location and are called primaries and secondaries.
PelagicX
The pelagic is a type of bird whose habitat is on the open ocean rather than in a coastal region or on inland bodies of water (lakes, rivers). An example of a pelagic bird is the blacklegged kittiwake.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X