Le Conte's Sparrow

Ammodramus leconteii

Order

PASSERIFORMES

Family

Emberizids (Emberizidae)

Code 4

LCSP

Code 6

AMMLEC

ITIS

ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The Le Conte's Sparrow is rated as Least Concern. This is a freshwater species that has a range of almost 3 million square kilometers. The population of Le Conte's Sparrow is estimated to be nearing 3 million individual birds. At this time Le Conte's Sparrow is not considered to be facing any immediate threats or dangers. The prior rating of this bird species was Lower Risk. The size of the range and population of this bird species are currently stable enough to warrant a Least Concern rating. It is native to Canada, the United States and Mexico.

IBIRD EXPLORER GENERAL

PHOTO SHARING AND DISCUSSION

BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

SUMMARY

Overview

Le Conte's Sparrow: Small sparrow, brown-streaked back, brown-streaked gray nape, pale gray underparts with streaks on sides, pale yellow breast. Head is flat with brown stripes. Face is pale yellow-orange with gray cheeks. Legs, feet are pink-brown.

 

Range and Habitat

Le Conte's Sparrow: Breeds from the southern Northwest Territories and central Quebec south to northern Montana, Minnesota, and the upper peninsula of Michigan. Spends winters in the southeastern states from Texas to North Carolina. Prefers moist grasslands and boggy meadows; stays on dry fields in winter.

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Le Conte's Sparrow SONGS AND CALLS

Le Conte's Sparrow A1

Call is a sharp "tsip".

Le Conte's Sparrow A2

Song is a series of insect-like buzzes.

Similar Sounding

Grasshopper Sparrow C1

Song is an insect-like, high-pitched "kip-kip-zeeeeeeeeee".

Savannah Sparrow C1

Song starts with a few short notes, then goes into a high buzz and ends with a lower trill.


Voice Text

"buzz", "tsip"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • Although the Le Conte's Sparrow was first discovered in 1790, the first nest was not found until nearly 100 years later.
  • Few have ever been banded. Of the 355 banded between 1967 and 1984, none were ever recovered.
  • This sparrow is almost impossible to flush, as it prefers running along the ground to flying.
  • A group of sparrows has many collective nouns, including a "crew", "flutter", "meinie", "quarrel", and "ubiquity" of sparrows.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP NORTH AMERICA

About this North America Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across North America.

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Gary Owen Dick

Artist

Yury Lisyak

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

BACKYARD BIRDING

BIRDS AND BIRDING

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UnderpartsX

Belly, undertail coverts, chest, flanks, and foreneck.

BreastX
The upper front part of a bird.
FaceX
The front part of the head consisting of the bill, eyes, cheeks and chin.
NapeX
Also called the hindneck or collar, it is the back of the neck where the head joins the body.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X