Limpkin

Aramus guarauna

Order

GRUIFORMES

Family

Limpkin (Aramidae)

Code 4

LIMP

Code 6

ARAGUA

ITIS

Egg Color:

Olive or buff marked with brown



Number of Eggs:

3 - 8



Incubation Days:

27



Egg Incubator:

Both sexes



Nest Location:

Above water.



Nest Material:

Marsh vegetation.



Migration:

Nonmigratory



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General

Limpkin: Large, unique marsh bird with dark brown body and white streaks on neck, back, wings, and breast. Bill is slightly decurved. Neck and legs are long. Sexes are similar. Juvenile is paler than adult. Vaguely resembles an ibis.

Range and Habitat

Limpkin: Occurs from peninsular Florida and southern Mexico, through the Caribbean and Central America to northern Argentina. In South America it occurs widely east of the Andes; west of them its range extends only to the Equator. Preferred habitats include wooded and brushy freshwater swamps and marshes.

Breeding and Nesting

Limpkin: Three to eight olive or buff eggs marked with brown are laid in a shallow nest made of marsh vegetation built just above the water; sometimes builds a stick nest in a low tree or bush. Eggs are incubated for 27 days by both parents.

Foraging and Feeding

Limpkin: Eats apple snails, other mollusks, frogs, and insects. Slowly walks along edges of ponds or streams foraging in shallow water.

Vocalization

Limpkin: Makes a loud, rolling wail "kkrrrraaow", mainly at night.

Similar Species

Limpkin: Yellow-crowned and Black-crowned Night-Herons have much shorter legs and necks, and shorter, thicker, straight bills.

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BreastX
The upper front part of a bird.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X