Yellow Rail

Coturnicops noveboracensis

Order

GRUIFORMES

Family

Rails, Gallinules and Coots (Rallidae)

Code 4

YERA

Code 6

COTNOV

ITIS

  • wgba_banner
  • ibird_banner
  • journal_banner
1 2 3

ILLUSTRATION

ask community
Copyright © 2004 - 2014 Mitch Waite Group

PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The Yellow Rail has a vast range reaching up to around 3.7 million square kilometers. This bird can be found a split range - with two differing populations. One resides yearound in Mexico and the second breeds in Canada and the northern United States after which it migrates to warmer coastal locations such as North Carolina and south to Florida and Texas. This species appears in wetlands such as bogs, marshes, swamps, fens and peatlands as well as coastal locations. The global population of this bird is estimated to be around 10 to 25 thousand individual birds. It is not believed that the population trends for this species will soon approach the minimum levels that could suggest a potential decline in population. Due to this, population trends for the Yellow Rail have a present evaluation level of Least Concern.

IBIRD EXPLORER GENERAL

PHOTO SHARING AND DISCUSSION

BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

SUMMARY

Overview

Yellow Rail: Small rail with pale yellow-striped, dark brown upperparts. White throat, buff breast, flanks, and belly are barred black-and-white. Head has buff face with dark brown cap, eye patches. Bill is short, yellow. Wings are dark with large white patches visible in flight. Short black tail.


Range and Habitat

Yellow Rail: Breeds from the Maritime Provinces to British Columbia and the southern part of the Northwest Territories, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, North Dakota, and Northern California. Migrates along the Atlantic coast to North Carolina and through the Midwest. Winters along the Gulf Coast from Florida to Texas and along the southern Atlantic states. Prefers wet meadows, and shallow grassy marshes with sedges. Winters on salt marshes, and rice fields.

whatbird search for your browser

SONGS AND CALLS

Voice Text

"tic-tic, tictictic, tic-tic tictictic"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • The Yellow Rail was first described in 1789 by Johann Friedrich Gmelin, a German naturalist.
  • Their distinctive clicking calls are given almost exclusively at night.
  • They are very elusive and seldom seen; when approached, they are more likely to rely on camouflage than flight.
  • A group of yellow rails are collectively known as a "clique" of rails.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP

CERange Map for Yellow Rail

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Gary Owen Dick

Artist

Yury Lisyak

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

BACKYARD BIRDING

BIRDS AND BIRDING

.
UpperpartsX
Back, rump, hindneck, wings, and crown.
BellyX
The ventral part of the bird, or the area between the flanks on each side and the crissum and breast. Flight muscles are located between the belly and the breast.
BreastX
The upper front part of a bird.
CapX
The area on top of the head of the bird.
FaceX
The front part of the head consisting of the bill, eyes, cheeks and chin.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X