Lesser Yellowlegs

Tringa flavipes

Order

CHARADRIIFORMES

Family

Sandpipers, Phalaropes (Scolopacidae)

Code 4

LEYE

Code 6

TRIFLA

ITIS

ILLUSTRATION

ask community
Copyright © 2004 - 2017 Mitch Waite Group

PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The Lesser Yellowlegs has a large range, estimated globally at 4,600,000 square kilometers. Native to the Americas and surrounding island nations and introduced to Asia, Europe and Africa, this bird prefers shrubland, grassland, wetland and marine ecosystems. The global population of this bird is estimated at 300,000 to 800,000 individuals and does not show signs of decline that would necessitate inclusion on the IUCN Red List. For this reason, the current evaluation status of the Lesser Yellowlegs is Least Concern.

IBIRD EXPLORER GENERAL

PHOTO SHARING AND DISCUSSION

BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

SUMMARY

Overview

Lesser Yellowlegs: This large sandpiper has gray and black mottled upperparts, white underparts, and streaked upper breast and sides. The bill is straight and uniformly dark gray. The white lower rump and dark-barred tail are visible in flight. The legs are long and yellow. It feeds on aquatic and terrestrial invertebrates. It has a swift direct flight with rapid wing beats. Sexes are similar.

 

Range and Habitat

Lesser Yellowlegs: Breeds from western Alaska and Canada east to western Quebec. Spends winters on coasts from southern California and Virginia southward, and along the Gulf coast. Preferred habitats include coastal mudflats, pans and lagoons, inland lakes, ponds, rivers, sewage works, and flooded grasslands.

whatbird search for your browser

Lesser Yellowlegs SONGS AND CALLS

Lesser Yellowlegs A1

Alarm call is a sharp, single or double "tu" note.

Lesser Yellowlegs C2

High-pitched flight calls as a small group takes off.

Similar Sounding

Marsh Sandpiper JJ1

"Tu-ee-u" and other whistled calls between a pair.


Voice Text

"Tew"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • While the Lesser Yellowlegs is similar in appearance to the Greater Yellowlegs, they are not closely related.
  • Both the male and female provide parental care to the young, but the female tends to leave the breeding area before the chicks can fly, thus leaving the male to defend the young until fledging.
  • When foraging, these birds are likely to scythe their bills back and forth in the water stirring up prey.
  • A group of yellowlegs are collectively known as an "incontinence" of yellowlegs.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP NORTH AMERICA

About this North America Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across North America.

RANGE MAP HAWAII

About this Hawaii Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across the Hawaiian island.

RANGE MAP PALAU

About this Palau Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across the Palau islands.

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Gary Owen Dick

Artist

Chris Vest

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

BACKYARD BIRDING

BIRDS AND BIRDING

.
UnderpartsX

Belly, undertail coverts, chest, flanks, and foreneck.

UpperpartsX
Back, rump, hindneck, wings, and crown.
BreastX
The upper front part of a bird.
RumpX
The area between the uppertail coverts and the back of the bird.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X