Laysan Albatross

Phoebastria immutabilis

Order

PROCELLARIIFORMES

Family

Albatross (Diomedeidae)

Code 4

LAAL

Code 6

PHOIMM

ITIS

ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Near Threatened

The Laysan Albatross is rated as Near Threatened at this time due to decreasing population trends over the past several years. This bird is known to breed in only sixteen locations. The population of the Laysan Albatross is estimated to be around 400,000 pairs. The largest known colony of this bird species is at Midway Atoll. This bird species is native to Mexico, Canada, the Marshall Islands, the Northern Mariana Islands, Russia and the United States. It is considered to be possibly extinct in Japan, but is sometimes seen in New Zealand.

SUMMARY

Overview

Laysan Albatross: Large seabird with dark brown back, white head, neck and rump, dark eye patch. Bill is thick and yellow with gray hooked tip. Wings dark brown above and white below, with irregular brown-black borders, dark brown-black with white coverts, and pink legs and feet. Feeds on fish and invertebrates. Dynamic soaring, stays aloft for hours with little flapping of wings. Sexes similar.

 

Range and Habitat

Laysan Albatross: This species breeds on isolated islands in the central Pacific Ocean, mostly on Hawaiian chain islands, but also on islands off the coasts of Japan, Mexico, and on the French Frigate Shoals. When not in breeding season, these birds migrate to islands around Bering Sea and the Aleutian archipelago.

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Laysan Albatross SONGS AND CALLS

Laysan Albatross G1

Bill clapping and low-pitched calls.

Laysan Albatross G2

Bill clapping and high-pitched squeaks and whistles.

Similar Sounding


Voice Text

"Eh-eh Eh-eh-eh"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • The Laysan Albatross is the second most common seabird in the Hawaiian Islands, with an estimated population of 2.5 million birds.
  • This bird is named for Laysan, which is one of its breeding colonies in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.
  • Albatrosses can fly for miles without flapping their wings. They let winds and rising air currents do the work for them.
  • A group of albatrosses are known collectively as a "flight", "rookery", and "weight" of albatrosses.
  • Satellite tracking reveals that some albatrosses fly around the entire planet in less than two months and can soar for six days without flapping their wings.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP NORTH AMERICA

About this North America Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across North America.

RANGE MAP HAWAII

About this Hawaii Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across the Hawaiian island.

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Artist

Irina Rud-Volga

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

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RumpX
The area between the uppertail coverts and the back of the bird.
FaceX
The front part of the head consisting of the bill, eyes, cheeks and chin.
PelagicX
The pelagic is a type of bird whose habitat is on the open ocean rather than in a coastal region or on inland bodies of water (lakes, rivers). An example of a pelagic bird is the blacklegged kittiwake.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X