Hudsonian Godwit

Limosa haemastica

Order

CHARADRIIFORMES

Family

Sandpipers, Phalaropes (Scolopacidae)

Code 4

HUGO

Code 6

LIMHAE

ITIS

ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The Hudsonian Godwit has a breeding range of 262,000 square kilometers. This includes grassy tundra near wetlands at scattered sites in Alaska, northern Canada, and on the coast of Hudson Bay. This species is a long distance migrant to wintering sites in Paraguay, southern Brazil, Uruguay, Chile, and Argentina. It has an estimated population of 77,000 breeding individuals, and is threatened by pollution and destruction of wetland habitats required for migration and on its wintering grounds. It has a conservation rating of Near Threatened.

IBIRD EXPLORER GENERAL

PHOTO SHARING AND DISCUSSION

BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

SUMMARY

Overview

Hudsonian Godwit: Large sandpiper with white-scaled, brown-black upperparts, black-barred chestnut-brown underparts. Long bill, slightly upcurved and pink with black tip. White rump, white wing-bar, black underwings visible in flight. Legs and feet are blue-gray. Swift, powerful undulating flight.

 

Range and Habitat

Hudsonian Godwit: Nests on mixed tundra/wetlands in northern Canada and Alaska. Migrates up through the Great Plains in the spring, and south off the Atlantic coast to South America for the winter. Preferred habitats include muddy, sandy, or rocky shores, freshwater marshes, mudflats, and flooded fields.

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Hudsonian Godwit SONGS AND CALLS

Hudsonian Godwit FFF2

Raspy call, then rapid series of "toe-wit" calls.

Hudsonian Godwit FFF1

Flight calls on breeding grounds.

Similar Sounding


Voice Text

"kae-wit"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • After breeding, the Hudsonian Godwit undertakes a migration from the subarctic to southern South America, in which it apparently makes nonstop flights of several thousand miles.
  • It is the smallest and least known of the world’s four godwit species.
  • It once was regarded as one of North America’s rarest birds; though it is now known to be much more numerous, it is still considered highly vulnerable because its population is concentrated at only a few sites.
  • A group of godwits are collectively known as an "omniscience", "pantheon", and "prayer" of godwits.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP NORTH AMERICA

About this North America Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across North America.

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Gary Owen Dick

Artist

Chris Vest

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

BACKYARD BIRDING

BIRDS AND BIRDING

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UnderpartsX

Belly, undertail coverts, chest, flanks, and foreneck.

UpperpartsX
Back, rump, hindneck, wings, and crown.
RumpX
The area between the uppertail coverts and the back of the bird.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X