Common Black-Hawk

Buteogallus anthracinus

Order

FALCONIFORMES

Family

Kites, Eagles and Hawks (Accipitridae)

Code 4

COBH

Code 6

BUTANT

ITIS

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ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The Clark’s Nutcracker is resident in treeline habitats in the Rocky Mountains of North America. It ranges from southern British Columbia and Alberta, Canada south to Arizona and New Mexico in the United States of America with outlying populations in the Black Hills of South Dakota, southern California, and northeastern Mexico. It makes caches of conifer seeds to help it survive in the harsh climate of its high mountain habitat and often becomes tame around people. The Clark’s Nutcracker is believed to have a large population that shows no signs of decline and is therefore given a conservation rating of Least Concern by the IUCN.

IBIRD EXPLORER GENERAL

PHOTO SHARING AND DISCUSSION

BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

SUMMARY

Overview

Common Black-Hawk: Large hawk, nearly all black with white patch just behind bill. Bill, legs and feet are bright orange-yellow. The tail is black with single, thick white band across the middle and a thin, white tip. Alternates deep steady wing beats with short to long glides. Soars on thermals.


Range and Habitat

Common Black-Hawk: Breeds in limited areas of the southwest, from Arizona to Texas, throughout Mexico, Central America, and northern South America to Guyana. Resident in the southern portions of its range from Mexico south. Inhabits coastal lowlands of mixed savannah, dunes, ponds, lagoons and grasslands.

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SONGS AND CALLS

Voice Text

"ka-a-a-ah, ka-a-a-ah"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • The Common Black-Hawk is often seen soaring, with occasional lazy flaps, and has a talon-touching aerial courtship display.
  • They often perch for long periods on a branch over water, waiting for their prey to appear.
  • This species is vulnerable to disturbance near its nesting sites and seems to be declining in the United States.
  • A group of hawks has many collective nouns, including a "boil", "knot", "spiraling", "stream", and "tower" of hawks.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP

CERange Map for Common Black-Hawk

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Gary Owen Dick

Artist

Yury Lisyak

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

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BIRDS AND BIRDING

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UnderpartsX
Belly, undertail coverts, chest, flanks, and foreneck.
Parts of a Standing bird X
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