Gadwall

Anas strepera

Order

ANSERIFORMES

Family

Ducks, Geese and Swans (Anatidae)

Code 4

GADW

Code 6

ANASTR

ITIS

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ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The Gadwall is rated as Least Concern at this time. The range of the Gadwall is approximately 10 million square kilometers. The population of this bird species is around 4 million individual birds. The previous rating for this bird was Lower Risk. That rating was updated in 2004 to reflect the current large range and population of the Gadwall. This bird species can be found in many countries throughout the world. At this time, there are no known serious dangers facing the Gadwall which might precipitate population decline in the near future.

IBIRD EXPLORER GENERAL

PHOTO SHARING AND DISCUSSION

BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

SUMMARY

Overview

Gadwall: This large dabbling duck has a finely barred gray body, black rump and under tail coverts, a white belly, and rust-brown shoulders. It has a gray-brown head and neck and gray bill. The wings have a black-bordered white speculum visible in flight. The legs and feet are yellow. It mostly feeds on submerged aquatic vegetation. It has a fast direct flight. The sexes are similar.


Range and Habitat

Gadwall: Breeds near seasonal and semi-permanent wetlands, mainly in the shortgrass, tallgrass, and mixed prairie regions of the U.S. and Canada. Spends winters in southern two-thirds of the U.S., with greatest concentrations found in the Central and Mississippi Flyways; also a common winter visitor to Guatemala. Preferred habitats include large, shallow ponds with lots of marsh plants.

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SONGS AND CALLS

Voice Text

"quack"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • The Gadwall duck was first described by Linnaeus in his Systema naturae in 1758 under its current scientific name.
  • It is not as gregarious as some dabbling ducks outside the breeding season and tends to form only small flocks.
  • A group of ducks has many collective nouns, including a "brace", "flush", "paddling", "raft", and "team" of ducks.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP

CERange Map for Gadwall

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Gary Owen Dick

Artist

Irina Rud-Volga

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

BACKYARD BIRDING

BIRDS AND BIRDING

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BellyX
The ventral part of the bird, or the area between the flanks on each side and the crissum and breast. Flight muscles are located between the belly and the breast.
RumpX
The area between the uppertail coverts and the back of the bird.
SpeculumX
The brightly colored area on the wing (secondaries of the wing) on several duck species.
Tail covertsX
The short tail feathers covering the base of the long tail feathers.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X