Yellow-billed Loon

Gavia adamsii

Order

GAVIIFORMES

Family

Loons (Gaviidae)

Code 4

YBLO

Code 6

GAVADA

ITIS

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ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The Yellow-billed Loon has an an enormous range reaching up to around from 1 to 10 million square kilometers. This bird can be found throughout North America and in many areas of Europe including both native and vagrant populations in Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden, Austria, Bulgaria, Italy and many other areas. It is also present in Japan and Korea as well as the Russian Federation. The species appears in wetlands and marine environments in both inland and coastal locations where it inhabits rivers, streams and creeks as well as lakes, estuaries and marshes. The global population of this species has not been quantified, and population trends for the Yellow-billed Loon have a present evaluation level of Least Concern.

IBIRD EXPLORER GENERAL

PHOTO SHARING AND DISCUSSION

BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

SUMMARY

Overview

Yellow-billed Loon: Large loon, white-spotted black upperparts, white underparts, gray sides with fine white spots. Head is glossy green-black; neck has black-and-white rings. Yellow bill. Dives for small fish, crustaceans. Direct flight on deep wing beats. Solitary, or in pairs and family groups.


Range and Habitat

Yellow-billed Loon: Breeds in the northern reaches of Canada and Alaska, but migrates in winter to coastal areas of southern Alaska and British Columbia, where it is commonly seen. Also winters along the Aleutian archipelago. Prefers tundra lakes and ponds in summer, winters on inshore coastal waters.

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SONGS AND CALLS

Voice Text

"ha-ha-ha-ha-ha"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • Yellow-billed Loons occasionally drown in nets, either put out for commercial, research, or subsistence purposes.
  • Oil spills are a major threat on their wintering grounds and for migrants.
  • Pairs will maintain the same territory year after year, taking on a new mate only if one does not return from migration.
  • A group of loons has many collective nouns, including an "asylum", "cry", "loomery", "raft", and "water dance" of loons.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP

CERange Map for Yellow-billed Loon

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Gary Owen Dick

Artist

Irina Rud-Volga

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

BACKYARD BIRDING

BIRDS AND BIRDING

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UnderpartsX
Belly, undertail coverts, chest, flanks, and foreneck.
UpperpartsX
Back, rump, hindneck, wings, and crown.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X