American Golden-Plover

Pluvialis dominica

Order

CHARADRIIFORMES

Family

Lapwings and Plovers (Charadriidae)

Code 4

AMGP

Code 6

PLUDOM

ITIS

ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The American Golden-Plover has a fairly large breeding range of 1,440,000 square kilometers. This includes tundra habitats in Alaska and northern Canada. For the winter, it undertakes a long distance migration to grasslands in southern Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay, and northern Argentina. This species has also occurred as a vagrant in a variety of other locations around the world, including South Africa and many locales in Europe. The estimated population of the American Golden-Plover is around 200,000 individuals. Although this species of bird had an evaluation of Lower Concern in 2000, that evaluation was changed in 2000 to a conservation rating of Least Concern.

IBIRD EXPLORER GENERAL

PHOTO SHARING AND DISCUSSION

BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

SUMMARY

Overview

American Golden-Plover: Medium sandpiper with black face, underparts. Back is dark brown with yellow spots; has a white S-shaped mark along head and sides. Markings provide camouflage to blend in with tundra breeding grounds. Bill is black, thin, and short. Swift direct flight on rapid wing beats.

 

Range and Habitat

American Golden-Plover: Among the widest ranging birds in the world, this species breeds on tundra from Alaska east to Baffin Island and migrates south over the Atlantic Ocean from Canadian Maritimes to South America; some birds winter on islands in Pacific and appear along west coast during migration. Preferred habitats include shores and prairies.

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American Golden-Plover SONGS AND CALLS

American Golden-Plover A1

"Ko-wee-ee" and other whistles.

American Golden-Plover A2

Song is a whistled "klu-eep" given during a flight display.

Similar Sounding


Voice Text

"ku-wheep"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • The American Golden-Plover annually performs one of the longest migrations of any American bird. They fly up to 20,000 miles per year, usually including a nonstop flight of 3,000-3,500 miles over the Atlantic.
  • They may be capable of maintaining seeds in their digestive tract to help them survive these long flights.
  • Weighing in at less than 0.5 pound, they are considered the fastest flying shorebird, reaching speeds of 60 mph.
  • A group of plovers has many collective nouns, including a "brace", "congregation", "deceit", "ponderance" and "wing" of plovers.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP NORTH AMERICA

About this North America Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across North America.

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Gary Owen Dick

Artist

Michael Oberhofer

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

BACKYARD BIRDING

BIRDS AND BIRDING

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UnderpartsX

Belly, undertail coverts, chest, flanks, and foreneck.

FaceX
The front part of the head consisting of the bill, eyes, cheeks and chin.
UpperpartsX
Back, rump, hindneck, wings, and crown.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X