Worm-eating Warbler

Helmitheros vermivorum

Order

PASSERIFORMES

Family

Wood-Warblers (Parulidae)

Code 4

WEWA

Code 6

HELVER

ITIS

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ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The Worm-eating Warbler has an enormous range reaching up to roughly 1.8 million square kilometers. This bird can be found in a majority of Central America and the Caribbean as well as North American areas. This species prefers forested locations in temperate and subtropical or tropical regions. The global population of this bird is estimated to be around 750,000 individuals. Currently, it is not believed that the population trends for this bird will soon approach the minimum levels that could suggest a potential decline in population. Due to this, population trends for the Worm-eating Warbler have a present evaluation level of Least Concern.

IBIRD EXPLORER GENERAL

PHOTO SHARING AND DISCUSSION

BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

SUMMARY

Overview

Worm-eating Warbler: Medium-sized, ground nesting warbler with olive-gray upperparts and pale yellow underparts. Yellow head has black crown stripes and eye-lines. As its name suggests, it eats a steady diet of moth caterpillars and worms. It usually forages in understory vegetation and dead leaves.


Range and Habitat

Worm-eating Warbler: Breeds from southeastern Iowa, across the Ohio Valley, into the Mid-Atlantic states and southern New England, ranging into the southern states. Spends winters in the tropics from central Mexico, the Yucatan Peninsula, and the West Indies to areas south. Dry, wooded hillsides are the preferred habitat of this species.

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SONGS AND CALLS

Voice Text

"chip", "tseet"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • The Worm-eating Warbler was first described in 1789 by Johann Friedrich Gmelin, a German naturalist, botanist and entomologist.
  • Despite its name, it only rarely, if ever, eats earthworms. Instead, it feeds mostly on caterpillars, which were once referred to as worms.
  • Late in incubation the female sits so tight on her nest that only touching her will flush her. Her cryptic coloring makes immobility a safe strategy.
  • A group of warblers has many collective nouns, including a "bouquet", "confusion", "fall", and "wrench" of warblers.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP

CERange Map for Worm-eating Warbler

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Gary Owen Dick

Artist

Michael Oberhofer

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

BACKYARD BIRDING

BIRDS AND BIRDING

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UnderpartsX

Belly, undertail coverts, chest, flanks, and foreneck.

UpperpartsX
Back, rump, hindneck, wings, and crown.
CrownX
The crown is the top part of the birds head.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X