Whooper Swan

Cygnus cygnus

Order

ANSERIFORMES

Family

Ducks, Geese and Swans (Anatidae)

Code 4

WHOS

Code 6

CYGCYG

ITIS

Egg Color:

Pale yellow



Number of Eggs:

4 - 6



Incubation Days:

35



Egg Incubator:

Female



Nest Location:

In shallow water.



Nest Material:

Heap of moss, reeds, or grass.



Migration:

Migratory



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General

Whooper Swan: Large, white swan with black and yellow bill; broad, yellow patch covers at least half of upper mandible. Sexes are similar. Juvenile is pale gray-brown and has pink bill with black tip. Rare visitor to Alaska.

Range and Habitat

Whooper Swan: Breeds across northern Eurasia. Most of them, that spend the winter in Britain and Ireland, originate from the population that breeds in Iceland. Population breeding in northwestern Europe winters in Denmark and Germany. Found on lowland farmland close to the coast, on flooded fields, mudflats, lakes and small ponds and lochs, and will graze on farmland in winter.

Breeding and Nesting

Whooper Swan: Four to six pale yellow eggs are laid on a large mound of reeds, sedges, and other plants, usually close to water. Female incubates eggs for approximately 35 days.

Foraging and Feeding

Whooper Swan: Diet consists of aquatic plants, grass, grains, and tubers.

Vocalization

Whooper Swan: Makes a low-pitched "whoop-whoop" in flight and a single bugled note when alarmed.

Similar Species

Whooper Swan: Bewick's (Tundra) Swan is much smaller and has shorter neck and less yellow on bill. Mute Swan is smaller with dull red to orange bill. Trumpeter Swan has mostly black bill.

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Upper mandibleX
The upper part of the bill.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X