Whooper Swan

Cygnus cygnus

Order

ANSERIFORMES

Family

Ducks, Geese and Swans (Anatidae)

Code 4

WHOS

Code 6

CYGCYG

ITIS

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ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The Whooper Swan has an an enormous range reaching up to around 10 million square kilometers. This bird can be found in many areas of Asia, the Middle East, Europe, the UK, and has vagrant populations in Northern Africa as well. This species appears in inland wetlands and lakes as well as in arable or farming regions also. The global population of this bird is estimated to be around 180,000 individual birds. It is not believed that the population trends for this species will soon approach the minimum levels that could suggest a potential decline in population. Due to this, population trends for the Whooper Swan have a present evaluation level of Least Concern.

IBIRD EXPLORER GENERAL

PHOTO SHARING AND DISCUSSION

BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

SUMMARY

Overview

Whooper Swan: Large, white swan with black and yellow bill; broad, yellow patch covers at least half of the upper mandible. Black legs and feet. Feeds by dipping head and neck in water. Eats invertebrates and aquatic plants. Strong direct flight with deep and steady wing beats. Flies in V formation.


Range and Habitat

Whooper Swan: Breeds across northern Eurasia. Most of them, that spend the winter in Britain and Ireland, originate from the population that breeds in Iceland. Population breeding in northwestern Europe winters in Denmark and Germany. Found on lowland farmland close to the coast, on flooded fields, mudflats, lakes and small ponds and lochs, and will graze on farmland in winter.

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SONGS AND CALLS

Voice Text

"whoop-whoop-whoop"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • The Whooper Swan is the national bird of Finland.
  • The global spread of H5N1, commonly known avian influenza or bird flu, reached the United Kingdom in April 2006 in the form of a dead Whooper Swan found in Scotland.
  • The yellow markings on their bill are like human fingerprints; they are all different. Each individual bird can be recognized by their bill pattern.
  • A group of swans has many collective nouns, including a "ballet", "bevy", "drift", "regatta", and "school" of swans.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP

CERange Map for Whooper Swan

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Gary Owen Dick

Artist

Yury Lisyak

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

BACKYARD BIRDING

BIRDS AND BIRDING

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Upper mandibleX
The upper part of the bill.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X