Trumpeter Swan

Cygnus buccinator

Order

ANSERIFORMES

Family

Ducks, Geese and Swans (Anatidae)

Code 4

TRUS

Code 6

CYGBUC

ITIS

ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The Trumpeter Swan has a large range, estimated globally at 1,400,000 square kilometers. Native to the United States and Canada, this bird prefers inland wetland and neritic marine ecosystems. The global population of this bird is estimated at 18,000 individuals and does not show signs of decline that would necessitate inclusion on the IUCN Red List. For this reason, the current evaluation status of the Trumpeter Swan is Least Concern.

IBIRD EXPLORER GENERAL

PHOTO SHARING AND DISCUSSION

BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

SUMMARY

Overview

Trumpeter Swan: Largest swan in the world, completely white but with head and neck often stained rust-brown from contact with ferrous minerals in wetland soils. Bill, legs, and feet are black. Feeds on aquatic plants. Strong direct flight on steady wing beats. Flies in straight line or V formation.

 

Range and Habitat

Trumpeter Swan: Nearly extirpated from overharvest and widespread destruction and degradation of wetlands. Breeds in Alaska, British Columbia, Northwest Territories, Alberta to southern Ontario, and south to Oregon, Nevada, Nebraska, and the Great Lakes region. Spends winters in southeastern Alaska, western British Columbia, and northwestern U.S. Rare to casual from northern California, the midwest, and the Great Lakes. Preferred habitats include marshes, lakes, and rivers with dense vegetation.

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Trumpeter Swan SONGS AND CALLS

Trumpeter Swan A2

Calls and sounds as a pair of birds take flight.

Trumpeter Swan A3

Mild alarm calls from a pair.

Similar Sounding

Tundra Swan A2

"Hoh" calls from a bird landing near a large flock.


Voice Text

"ko-hoh"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • The Trumpeter Swan is the largest waterfowl species native to North America.
  • By 1900, it was widely believed that the species had been hunted to extinction for its feathers, skin, meat and eggs. Fortunately, a small nonmigratory population survived in the remote mountain valleys of Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming.
  • In the early 1950s, a large population of these birds were found in Alaska and today their population is estimated at close to 16,000.
  • A group of swans has many collective nouns, including a "ballet", "bevy", "drift", "regatta", and "school" of swans.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP NORTH AMERICA

About this North America Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across North America.

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Gary Owen Dick

Artist

Yury Lisyak

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BIRDS AND BIRDING

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Parts of a Standing bird X
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