Greater Sage-Grouse

Centrocercus urophasianus

Order

GALLIFORMES

Family

Partridges, Grouse, Turkeys, Old World Quail (Phasianidae)

Code 4

GRSG

Code 6

CENURO

ITIS

ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Near Threatened

The Greater Sage-Grouse inhabits the sagebrush lands in the western United States, and southern Alberta and Saskatchewan, Canada. This bird is a year-round permanent resident, and non-migratory. However, some may move to lower elevations during the winter. They forage for food on the ground, eating insects, sagebrush and other plants. Nests are built under sagebrushes on the ground. Numbers of the Greater Sage-Grouse have declined due to loss of their natural habitat, and is very susceptible to humid climates caused by global warming. The conservation rating of the Greater Sage-Grouse is Near Threatened.

IBIRD EXPLORER GENERAL

PHOTO SHARING AND DISCUSSION

BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

SUMMARY

Overview

Greater Sage Grouse: Largest North American grouse, has scaled gray-brown upperparts, white breast, black throat, bib, and belly, and yellow combs above eyes. Large, white collar-like patch on breast conceals two yellow air sacs displayed during courtship. Tail feathers are long and pointed.

 

Range and Habitat

Greater Sage-Grouse: This species is a resident from southern Alberta and Saskatchewan south to Utah and Colorado, and also from Washington and northeastern California east to the Dakotas. Its preferred habitats include the open country and sagebrush plains. Some individuals move to lower elevations within their range during winter months.

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Greater Sage-Grouse SONGS AND CALLS

Greater Sage-Grouse A1

Lekking sounds from a male bird, including tail swishes and popping noises from esophageal pouches.

Greater Sage-Grouse A2

Tail rattles from two males during a lekking display.

Similar Sounding


Voice Text

"kuk-kuk-kuk"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • Like many other grouse species, the Greater Sage-Grouse male plays no role in the raising of the young.
  • Males perform a strutting display on dancing grounds known as leks. Traditional lekking grounds may be used for years.
  • Although many males may display at a lek, only one or two males get picked by a majority of the females for mating.
  • A group of grouse has many collective nouns, including a "chorus", "covey", "drumming", "grumbling", and "leash" of grouse.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP NORTH AMERICA

About this North America Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across North America.

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Gary Owen Dick

Artist

Kavita Jhunjhunwala

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

BACKYARD BIRDING

BIRDS AND BIRDING

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UpperpartsX
Back, rump, hindneck, wings, and crown.
BellyX
The ventral part of the bird, or the area between the flanks on each side and the crissum and breast. Flight muscles are located between the belly and the breast.
BreastX
The upper front part of a bird.
ChestX
Also called the breast area, it is the frontal area on the body containing the breastplate and major flight muscles.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X