Baird's Sparrow

Ammodramus bairdii

Order

PASSERIFORMES

Family

Emberizids (Emberizidae)

Code 4

BAIS

Code 6

AMMBAI

ITIS

ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The Baird's Sparrow has a fairly large breeding range of 377,000 square kilometers in the northern prairie states and parts of central Canada. It breeds in prairie grasslands, and winters in grassland habitats in parts of the south-western United States and north-central Mexico. Currently, the estimated breeding population of this bird species is around two million individual birds. Although changes and reduction in habitat have caused declines for this species, habitat management has stabilized populations in some areas, and it is still believed to have a population large enough to warrant a conservation rating of Least Concern.

IBIRD EXPLORER GENERAL

PHOTO SHARING AND DISCUSSION

BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

SUMMARY

Overview

Baird's Sparrow: Small sparrow with pale-streaked, rich dark brown upperparts, white underparts, and dark streaks on upper breast and flanks. Orange-brown crown is marked with fine dark lines. Legs and feet are pink-brown. Short low flights, alternates rapid wing beats with wings pulled to sides.

 

Range and Habitat

Baird's Sparrow: Breeds from Alberta and southwestern Manitoba south to Montana and South Dakota. Spends winters in Texas, Arizona, and northern Mexico. Breeds in native prairies of tall grasses and scattered weeds and brush. Will occasionally nest in wheat fields. Found in agricultural fields, grasslands, and prairies during migration.

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Baird's Sparrow SONGS AND CALLS

Baird's Sparrow A1

Song is a clear, loud series of ringing notes ending in a melodious trill, "ze ze she zurrrrrrrl".

Baird's Sparrow A2

Call is a sharp and insect-like "chip".

Similar Sounding


Voice Text

"zip-zip-zip-zr-r-rrrrrrrrrrr"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • John James Audubon collected the first specimens of Baird's Sparrow in 1843 in North Dakota. The species was not recorded again for 29 years.
  • These birds are partially nomadic, with breeding populations shifting dramatically among locations from year to year. This tendency probably evolved in response to the effects of drought, fire, and movements of bison herds over the prairie.
  • They like open areas with a mix of native prairie grass blended with forbs. They are usually more abundant two to three years after a fire. As shrubs grow back, their numbers decline again.
  • A group of sparrows has many collective nouns, including a "crew", "flutter", "meinie", "quarrel", and "ubiquity" of sparrows.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP NORTH AMERICA

About this North America Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across North America.

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Gary Owen Dick

Artist

Yury Lisyak

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

BACKYARD BIRDING

BIRDS AND BIRDING

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UnderpartsX

Belly, undertail coverts, chest, flanks, and foreneck.

UpperpartsX
Back, rump, hindneck, wings, and crown.
BreastX
The upper front part of a bird.
CrownX
The crown is the top part of the birds head.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X