Oak Titmouse

Baeolophus inornatus

Order

PASSERIFORMES

Family

Titmice and Chickadees (Paridae)

Code 4

OATI

Code 6

BAEINO

ITIS

ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The Oak Titmouse has a large range, reaching up to roughly 170,000 square kilometers. This bird can be found in Mexico and the United States where it prefers a variety of habitats. It appears in urban areas as well as subtropical and tropical shrub lands as well as forested areas. The global population of this species is estimated to be around 900,000 individual birds. Currently, it is not believed that the population trends for this bird will soon approach the minimum levels that could suggest a potential decline in population. Due to this, population trends for the Oak Titmouse have a present evaluation level of Least Concern.

IBIRD EXPLORER GENERAL

PHOTO SHARING AND DISCUSSION

BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

SUMMARY

Overview

Oak Titmouse: Medium-sized titmouse with pale, brown-tinged gray upperparts and paler face and underparts. The bill is small and black, and legs and feet are gray. Weak, fluttering flight. A recently formed species, and along with the Juniper Titmouse, was known as the Plain Titmouse until 1996.

 

Range and Habitat

Oak Titmouse: This species is a resident from southern Oregon south along the Pacific coast and to inland areas of California south to the northern Baja Peninsula. Its preferred habitats include live oaks and deciduous growth, including oak woodlands, streamside cottonwoods, forest edges, and oak-juniper woodlands.

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Oak Titmouse SONGS AND CALLS

Oak Titmouse A1

Typical "tsicka-dee-dee" calls.

Oak Titmouse C1

Various calls.

Similar Sounding

Juniper Titmouse A2

Song is a series of evenly-pitched, rapid series of 3-7 whistled syllables.


Voice Text

"see-dee-dee", "chick-a-dee-dee"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • The Oak Titmouse mates for life, and pairs defend year-round territories.
  • Unlike other members of the family, they do not form flocks in winter.
  • A group of titmice are collectively known as a "banditry" and a "dissimulation" of titmice.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP NORTH AMERICA

About this North America Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across North America.

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Gary Owen Dick

Artist

Michael Oberhofer

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

BACKYARD BIRDING

BIRDS AND BIRDING

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UnderpartsX

Belly, undertail coverts, chest, flanks, and foreneck.

UpperpartsX
Back, rump, hindneck, wings, and crown.
FaceX
The front part of the head consisting of the bill, eyes, cheeks and chin.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X