Brown Creeper

Certhia americana

Order

PASSERIFORMES

Family

Creeper (Certhiidae)

Code 4

BRCR

Code 6

CERAME

ITIS

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ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The Brown Creeper has a large range, estimated globally at 6,500,000 square kilometers. It breeds in mature, boreal and mixed deciduous forests in much of southern, central, and western Canada, southern Alaska, the northeastern and western United States, and the highlands of Mexico and northern Central America. It winters in a variety of woodland habitats in much of the United States, and parts of northern Mexico. The global breeding population is estimated to be 9.3 million individuals, and the current evaluation level of the Brown Creeper is Least Concern.

IBIRD EXPLORER GENERAL

PHOTO SHARING AND DISCUSSION

BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

SUMMARY

Overview

Brown Creeper: Small, tree-clinging bird with brown-streaked upperparts and white underparts. White line over eye and long, decurved bill are conspicuous. Legs and feet are pink-buff. Feeds on insects, larvae, nuts and seeds. Strong direct flights of short duration on rapid and shallow wing beats.

 

Range and Habitat

Brown Creeper: Breeds from the south coast of Alaska east to Newfoundland and southward to the western and northern U.S and along the Rocky Mountains into southern Mexico. Spends winters in breeding range and areas south throughout the states to the Gulf coast and Florida. Preferred habitats include deciduous and mixed woodlands.

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SONGS AND CALLS

Voice Text

"see-see-titi-see", "tsee"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • Brown Creepers will freeze when threatened, often with outspread wings, and remain motionless for several minutes. At these times, their brown plumage is such an effective camouflage they can be nearly invisible.
  • In some areas their nests often have two openings, one that serves as an entrance and the other as an exit.
  • They start at the bottom of a tree, spiral upward pecking insects as it ascends, then hops down to the base of the next tree and begins again.
  • A group of creepers are collectively known as a "sleeze" and a "spiral" of creepers.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP NORTH AMERICA

About this North America Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across North America.

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Gary Owen Dick

Artist

Imran Kahn

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

BACKYARD BIRDING

BIRDS AND BIRDING

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UnderpartsX

Belly, undertail coverts, chest, flanks, and foreneck.

UpperpartsX
Back, rump, hindneck, wings, and crown.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X