Dark-eyed Junco

Junco hyemalis

Order

PASSERIFORMES

Family

Sparrows (Emberizidae)

Code 4

DEJU

Code 6

JUNHYE

ITIS

  • wgba_banner
  • ibird_banner
  • journal_banner
1 2 3

ILLUSTRATION

ask community
Copyright © 2004 - 2014 Mitch Waite Group

PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The Dark-eyed Junco has a large range, spanning across Mexico, the United States and many island nations to which the bird is native, as well as many parts of Europe. This bird prefers forest and shrubland ecosystems, though it has been known to reside in rural gardens. The global population of this bird has not been determined or quantified, but it does not appear to meet population size or decline criteria that would necessitate inclusion on the IUCN Red List. The current evaluation status of the Dark-eyed Junco is Least Concern.

IBIRD EXPLORER GENERAL

PHOTO SHARING AND DISCUSSION

BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

SUMMARY

Overview

Dark-eyed Junco: Medium-sized sparrow with considerable geographic color variation, although all exhibit a pink bill, dark eyes, white belly, and dark-centered tail with white outer feathers. Gray-headed form has gray head, rump, breast, and sides, and rust-brown back. Slate-colored form is slate-gray overall with darker head. Oregon form has black hood, chestnut-brown back and buff-brown flanks. White-winged form is blue-gray overall and shows two white wing bars. Pink-sided form is blue-gray with darker wings and pink-gray flanks. Female of each form resembles male but is usually paler. Juveniles of all forms are heavily streaked brown with darker heads, white bellies, and white outer tail feathers.


Range and Habitat

Dark-eyed Junco: Breeds from Alaska east across Canada to Newfoundland, and south to the mountains in Mexico and Georgia. Winters south to the Gulf Coast and northern Mexico. Preferred habitats include openings and edges of coniferous and mixed woods. In the winter, frequents fields, roadsides, parks, and suburban gardens.

whatbird search for your browser

SONGS AND CALLS

Voice Text

"dit", "tsick", "tchet"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • A flash of white tail feathers serves as an alarm to other members of the flock.
  • The Dark-eyed Junco was the most common feeder bird in North America during the 1996-1997 Project FeederWatch season.
  • They mainly eat insects and seeds. However, they will sometimes eat their own droppings.
  • A group of sparrows has many collective nouns, including a "crew", "flutter", "meinie", "quarrel", and "ubiquity" of sparrows.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP

CERange Map for Dark-eyed Junco

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Gary Owen Dick

Artist

Yury Lisyak

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

BACKYARD BIRDING

BIRDS AND BIRDING

.
BellyX
The ventral part of the bird, or the area between the flanks on each side and the crissum and breast. Flight muscles are located between the belly and the breast.
BreastX
The upper front part of a bird.
Outer tail feathersX
The tail feathers farthest from the center.
RumpX
The area between the uppertail coverts and the back of the bird.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X