Wrentit

Chamaea fasciata

Order

PASSERIFORMES

Family

Babblers (Timaliidae)

Code 4

WREN

Code 6

CHAFAS

ITIS

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ILLUSTRATION

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PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The Wrentit has a large range reaching up to around 260,000 square kilometers. This bird can be found in its native habitats of Mexico and the United States where it is seen mostly in shrubland locations. The global population of this bird is estimated to be around 1.5 million individual birds. Currently, it is not believed that the population trends for this species will soon approach the minimum levels that could suggest a potential decline in population. Due to this, population trends for the Wrentit have a present evaluation level of Least Concern.

IBIRD EXPLORER GENERAL

PHOTO SHARING AND DISCUSSION

BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY

SUMMARY

Overview

Wrentit: Small, noisy songbird with dark gray-brown upperparts, thick streaked, red-brown to buff-brown underparts. Bill is short and black. Tail is very long and dark. Eyes are creamy white, bill is short and gray. Legs and feet are gray. Northern birds have darker upperparts than southern birds.


Range and Habitat

Wrentit: This species is a year-round resident on the Pacific coast of North America from the Columbia River on the northern border of Oregon southward along coastal chaparral into northern Baja California and into the Sierra Nevada foothills of California. Chaparral, shrubs, and brush are its preferred habitats.

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SONGS AND CALLS

Voice Text

"pit-pit-pit-tr-r-r-r-r-r-r-r", "peep-peep-peep-pee-pee-peepeepeepeprrr"

INTERESTING FACTS

  • It used to be considered the sole member of the family Chamaeidae, but genetic studies show that it is the only American representative of the large Old World family of babblers, Timaliidae.
  • Pairs mate for life, and may be together for more than 12 years. Both sexes incubate and sing to defend the territory.
  • The Wrentit was first described in 1845 by William Gambel, an American naturalist and collector.
  • Their vibrant song is likened to the sound of a "bouncing ball" and is easily heard and recognized. In fact, they are more often heard than seen.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP

CERange Map for Wrentit

FAMILY DESCRIPTION

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Gary Owen Dick

Artist

Imran Kahn

HELP ME IDENTIFY A BIRD

BACKYARD BIRDING

BIRDS AND BIRDING

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UnderpartsX
Belly, undertail coverts, chest, flanks, and foreneck.
UpperpartsX
Back, rump, hindneck, wings, and crown.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X